April Flowers
This blog is like me - eclectic... a little fangirl, a little designer, a little political junkie. Enjoy the chaos! :)

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1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 52,315 notes
theniftyfifties:

Grace Kelly on the set of ‘High Society’, 1956.

theniftyfifties:

Grace Kelly on the set of ‘High Society’, 1956.

1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 553 notes
1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 10 notes
1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 1,509 notes

timelords-sherlock-andmusic:

come-along-amelia:

youleavethetardisbreakson:

orsmell-ya-later-bitches:

If you ever feel down and/or lack of self confidence : remember that you are unique in the universe.

Scenes like this is why I love Doctor Who.

this is one of my absolute favourite scenes yet

getting rid of that existence isn’t a sacrifice, it is a waste. 

1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 119,934 notes
scienceyoucanlove:

‘Coelacanth’ Genome Unlocked
The genes of this fish, sometimes called a living fossil, reveal much about the origins of tetrapods, the evolutionary line that gave rise to amphibians, birds and mammals
By Chris Woolston and Nature magazine
The South African fisherman who pulled a prehistoric-looking blue creature out of his net in 1938 had unwittingly snagged one of the zoological finds of the century: a 1.5-meter-long coelacanth, a type of fish that had been thought to have become extinct 70 million years earlier.
Since then, scientists have identified two species of coelacanth, one African and one Indonesian. With their fleshy, lobed fins — complete with bones and joints — and round, paddle-like tails, they look strikingly similar to the coelacanths that lived during the Cretaceous period, when dinosaurs still roamed Earth.
Now, an international team of scientists has sequenced and analyzed the genome of the African coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae; the findings are reported on page 311.
Like lungfish, the other surviving lineage of lobe-finned fishes, coelacanths are actually more closely related to humans and other mammals than to ray-finned fishes such as tuna and trout. Ancient lobe fins were the first vertebrates to brave the land, and the coelacanth genome is expected to reveal much about the origins of tetrapods, the evolutionary line that gave rise to amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, says lead author Chris Amemiya, a biologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “The coelacanth is a cornerstone for our attempt to understand tetrapod evolution,” he says.
read more 

scienceyoucanlove:

‘Coelacanth’ Genome Unlocked

The genes of this fish, sometimes called a living fossil, reveal much about the origins of tetrapods, the evolutionary line that gave rise to amphibians, birds and mammals

By Chris Woolston and Nature magazine

The South African fisherman who pulled a prehistoric-looking blue creature out of his net in 1938 had unwittingly snagged one of the zoological finds of the century: a 1.5-meter-long coelacanth, a type of fish that had been thought to have become extinct 70 million years earlier.

Since then, scientists have identified two species of coelacanth, one African and one Indonesian. With their fleshy, lobed fins — complete with bones and joints — and round, paddle-like tails, they look strikingly similar to the coelacanths that lived during the Cretaceous period, when dinosaurs still roamed Earth.

Now, an international team of scientists has sequenced and analyzed the genome of the African coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae; the findings are reported on page 311.

Like lungfish, the other surviving lineage of lobe-finned fishes, coelacanths are actually more closely related to humans and other mammals than to ray-finned fishes such as tuna and trout. Ancient lobe fins were the first vertebrates to brave the land, and the coelacanth genome is expected to reveal much about the origins of tetrapods, the evolutionary line that gave rise to amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, says lead author Chris Amemiya, a biologist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “The coelacanth is a cornerstone for our attempt to understand tetrapod evolution,” he says.

read more 

1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 59 notes

antarascribes:

This is why I love this fandom.

1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 24,239 notes
socialismartnature:

Yesterday, at 7:05pm Eastern Time, Boston Police received a report that suspected terrorist Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was hiding in a boat in Watertown. At 7:15pm, a drone was heard overheard. Seconds later, an enormous explosion destroyed the boat, as well as 10 nearby homes.  Sources say 46 Watertown residents were casualties of the missile strike, including 7 children.  … Wouldn’t that be an unconscionable end to this ordeal? If so, then why are we okay with us doing this in Pakistan? And if you’re not okay with us doing that, then you don’t get to wave an American flag and chant “USA USA!” when we catch a terrorist. Why? Because that same flag is painted on the side of the missiles we use to commit our own acts of terror.

socialismartnature:

Yesterday, at 7:05pm Eastern Time, Boston Police received a report that suspected terrorist Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was hiding in a boat in Watertown.

At 7:15pm, a drone was heard overheard. Seconds later, an enormous explosion destroyed the boat, as well as 10 nearby homes.

Sources say 46 Watertown residents were casualties of the missile strike, including 7 children.



Wouldn’t that be an unconscionable end to this ordeal?

If so, then why are we okay with us doing this in Pakistan?

And if you’re not okay with us doing that, then you don’t get to wave an American flag and chant “USA USA!” when we catch a terrorist.

Why? Because that same flag is painted on the side of the missiles we use to commit our own acts of terror.

1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 2,508 notes
wilwheaton:

Your daily constitutional scholar, with a degree from Hannity University.

wilwheaton:

Your daily constitutional scholar, with a degree from Hannity University.

1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 401 notes

Talking to my dad about Doctor Who

Me: *Explaining about the Tenth Doctor regenerating*
Dad: No I don't approve
Dad: How can they do this to me?
Me: ..
Dad: I already love this Doctor and now he's going to die?
Dad: No
Dad: Tell the writers that your dad is upset about this
Me: There's still the Eleventh Doctor
Dad: Yeah but when I start loving him, they'll take him away from me too
Dad: They're taking everything I love
Dad: First Supernatural and now this
1 year ago on April 21st, 2013 | J | 12,583 notes